Search Results: the problem is we eat in the car, in front of the Tv and increasingly alone

The Pot Proposition; Living With Medical Marijuana

…him as a “care giver.” The language of 215 gives patients and their care givers the right to cultivate marijuana; whether a grower unknown to a patient can, in any…

Chatting with Michael Pollan of The Omnivore’s Dilemma

…tempted by Twix or Pringles, or things like that. After you don’t eat that stuff for a while your taste buds change and you can’t really eat them anymore. There’s…

Why Eating Well Is ‘Elitist’

…costs more than it does to eat poorly. Indeed, the rules of the game by which we eat create a situation in which it is actually rational to eat poorly….

Weed It and Reap

…versus ranchers) without a whole lot of input or attention from mere eaters. Not this year. The eaters have spoken, much to the consternation of farm-state legislators who have fought…

Book Review: In Defense of Food

…fathom a carrot’s complexity in order to reap its benefits,” he writes. And so, the suggestions: Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize. Avoid products that make health claims. Shop…

Town-Building Is No Mickey Mouse Operation

…very ugly manner. There was a lot of talk about property values. Instead of facing up to the problems—and believe me, the majority agrees there are problems—they hold pep rallies!…

Pollan Cooks!

The seven most famous words in the movement for good food are: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” They were written, of course, by Michael Pollan, in “In Defense…

Weeds Are Us

…into hot spots thick with hunter-orange and fire-engine poppies, behind which rose great sunflower towers. The nasturtiums poured out their sand-dollar leaves into neat, low mounds dabbed with crimson and

Vote for the Dinner Party

…to the consumers who actually eat the stuff. Presumably that silence owes to the fact that, to date, genetically modified foods don’t offer the eater any benefits whatsoever — only…

Taking Food Seriously

the last century, “all of nature is a conjugation of the verb to eat, in the active and passive.” Even the eating of a Twinkie represents transactions between species, though…