Interviews & Profiles

Voting With Their Forks

SUMMER is supposed to be the mindless season, with nothing deeper to contemplate than the instant gratification of barbecues and ice cream. But something is different this year. America is getting serious about eating. In the last couple of months a choir of disparate voices has been sending the same message through books, magazines and

Taking a Bite out of ‘Organics’

For organic farmer Judith Redmond and others like her, Michael Pollan, who wrote “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals,” is more than a bestselling author. “In our world,” she said, “he’s a rock star.” That’s why the balding, bespectacled Pollan cannot shop at his Berkeley farmers market without being approached by adoring

A Tussle, Of Sorts, Over Organics

A few weeks ago, I was alerted to a fascinating online exchange involving two people who care passionately about organic food. In one corner sat Michael Pollan, the well-known author who, in April, published “The Omnivore’s Dilemma.” In the other sat John P. Mackey, the co-founder and chief executive of Whole Foods Market, which, with

Q&A with Michael Pollan: Think Global, Eat Local

You’re standing in the supermarket contemplating a nice warm-weather meal — maybe grilled fish or chicken and salad. But you worry: Is there any local or organic produce, or does that even matter? Is the salmon wild, or does it come from those fish farms that you hear might not be clean? Were the chickens

The Colbert Report Interview

Author Michael Pollan explains how modern food choices will make future generations have shorter lives.

Eat the Press

Michael Pollan has built a reputation as a sleuthing agro-journalist. In his writing for The New York Times Magazine and a quartet of books, he’s trailed a steer from birth to dinner plate, traced America’s obesity epidemic to corn subsidies, and narrowly, fumblingly outwitted a small-town cop who came uncomfortably close to his marijuana patch.

Third Degree Interview: Michael Pollan

“The omnivore’s dilemma,”? a phrase coined 30 years ago by research psychologist Paul Rozin, is the basic quandary we all face: As omnivores, what should humans eat when we could, hypothetically, eat anything? In Michael Pollan’s recently released book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, the author delves into America’s twisted nutritional

How Michael Pollan Ruined My Life: Thinking about where our food is coming from

It’s hard not to like Michael Pollan. A contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and a best-selling author whose new book, “The Omnivore’s Dilemma,” was released last month, he is down-to-earth, friendly and easy to talk to. His course evaluations at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism — where he is a professor

Michael Pollan’s Food for Thought

By guest host Anthony Brooks: If we accept the old adage that you are what you eat, then Michael Pollan has some unsettling news: we are mostly processed corn that walks. That’s one of his conclusions in his new book, “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals.” Another is that America has a

Acclaimed author takes an enlightening trip through our food chain

Rare is the day when yet another new book about food isn’t dropped onto my desk. Rarer still is the occasion when the latest reaches beyond the usual fare. After a while, food publishing be comes a blur of recipes punctuated by pretty pictures, or one more round of dietary diatribe. Michael Pollan is a