Interviews & Profiles

Michael Pollan: The Believer Interview

Michael Pollan is a nature writer of sorts. Throughout his career, his subjects have been places where people live and work, where humans take part in nature instead of just watching passively. This stands in distinction to a strain of nature writing that concentrates on wilderness. To put the contrast in simple terms: while someone

It’s All Storytelling: An Interview with Michael Pollan

Michael Pollan is, among other things, a writer, editor, gardener, and teacher. He spent 10 years as Executive Editor at Harpers Magazine (1984–94), is a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine, and has published four books: Second Nature: A Gardener’s Education (1991), A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder

Engaging with the Omnivore

Over the past several years, journalist Michael Pollan has been assessing what he calls “our national eating disorder.”? Subsidies on corn fuel this epidemic as they cheaply allow factory farm feedlots to flourish. Pollan documented the life of one steer in particular, showing this cheap food comes with a high cost. In addition to exploring

Voting With Their Forks

SUMMER is supposed to be the mindless season, with nothing deeper to contemplate than the instant gratification of barbecues and ice cream. But something is different this year. America is getting serious about eating. In the last couple of months a choir of disparate voices has been sending the same message through books, magazines and

Taking a Bite out of ‘Organics’

For organic farmer Judith Redmond and others like her, Michael Pollan, who wrote “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals,” is more than a bestselling author. “In our world,” she said, “he’s a rock star.” That’s why the balding, bespectacled Pollan cannot shop at his Berkeley farmers market without being approached by adoring

A Tussle, Of Sorts, Over Organics

A few weeks ago, I was alerted to a fascinating online exchange involving two people who care passionately about organic food. In one corner sat Michael Pollan, the well-known author who, in April, published “The Omnivore’s Dilemma.” In the other sat John P. Mackey, the co-founder and chief executive of Whole Foods Market, which, with

Q&A with Michael Pollan: Think Global, Eat Local

You’re standing in the supermarket contemplating a nice warm-weather meal — maybe grilled fish or chicken and salad. But you worry: Is there any local or organic produce, or does that even matter? Is the salmon wild, or does it come from those fish farms that you hear might not be clean? Were the chickens

The Colbert Report Interview

Author Michael Pollan explains how modern food choices will make future generations have shorter lives.

Eat the Press

Michael Pollan has built a reputation as a sleuthing agro-journalist. In his writing for The New York Times Magazine and a quartet of books, he’s trailed a steer from birth to dinner plate, traced America’s obesity epidemic to corn subsidies, and narrowly, fumblingly outwitted a small-town cop who came uncomfortably close to his marijuana patch.

Third Degree Interview: Michael Pollan

“The omnivore’s dilemma,”? a phrase coined 30 years ago by research psychologist Paul Rozin, is the basic quandary we all face: As omnivores, what should humans eat when we could, hypothetically, eat anything? In Michael Pollan’s recently released book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, the author delves into America’s twisted nutritional