Interviews & Profiles

Michael Pollan Debunks Food Myths

The human digestive tract has about the same number of neurons as the spinal column. What are they there for? The final word isn’t in yet, but Michael Pollan thinks their existence suggests that digestion may be more than the rather mundane process of breaking down food into chemicals. And, keeping those numerous digestive neurons

Lancaster Farming Speaks With Michael Pollan

In this issue of Lancaster Farming we interview Michael Pollan, guru of the “real food” movement. He spoke recently by phone from his home in California with Northern edition editor Tracy Sutton. Pollan is the author of “In Defense of Food,” and the previous critically acclaimed best-seller “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four

Interview with Michael Pollan

Sure, I’m on a food binge. But not what is usually meant when one hears the words “food” and “binge” put together. Readers can’t but help having noticed the cookbooks creeping into The Rolling Shelves, and the increasing number of food-related books that have come my way. A couple of weeks ago, I ran the

In Defense of Food

“Eat food. Mostly plants. Not too much.” As manifestos go, it’s hardly “Workers of the world unite!” But for Michael Pollan, that little piece of grandmotherly wisdom is a long overdue counter-revolutionary rallying cry for reclaiming how we eat. In his last book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Michael Pollan looked at how we procure and prepare

Author Michael Pollan goes ‘In Defense of Food’

Michael Pollan came to his calling by accident. Tall and lanky, a student of the essayists Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson, he thought he would end up an English professor. But a garden intervened. And a rather unfortunate incident involving a woodchuck, cabbage seedlings and a gallon of gasoline. More on that later.

The New American Meal: A Panel Discussion with Mollie Katzen, Michael Pollan, and Ann Vileisis

“You are what you eat,” we’re so often told. And that is certainly true, but if you care to pursue that line of reasoning, you’ll start looking more closely at the individual components of your meals and their ingredients. Michael Pollan decided to follow this line, and the result was the best-selling and utterly compelling

Author Comes to Natural Food’s ‘Defense’

Author Michael Pollan discusses his latest book, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto. He boils his philosophy of nutrition down to seven words: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” Pollan suggests that people can improve their health by following relatively simple rules, such as: “Don’t eat anything that your great-grandmother would not recognize

Food Fight

BROOKE GLADSTONE: For decades, the consumption of news has complicated our consumption of – food. Nowadays, what we buy to eat is determined by shifting health studies. Carbs are good for you. No, they’re bad. Fats make you fat. No, they don’t. And food labels only increase our confusion. Michael Pollan, journalist and professor of

‘In Defense of Food’ Author Offers Advice for Health

“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” That’s the advice journalist and author Michael Pollan offers in his new book, In Defense of Food. “That’s it. That is the short answer to the supposedly incredibly complicated and confusing question of what we humans should eat in order to be maximally healthy,” Pollan tells Steve Inskeep.

Table Talk: A Conversation with Michael Pollan

In his 1996 book Tasting Food, Tasting Freedom, the great food anthropologist Sidney Mintz concluded that the United States had no cuisine. Interestingly, Mintz’s definition of cuisine came down to conversation. For Mintz, Americans just didn’t engage in passionate talk about food. Unlike the southwest French and their cassoulet, most Americans don’t obsess and quarrel